Tag Archive | learning

Technology in the workplace: How learning experiences are changing

If I asked you for the time, would you check on your analog wristwatch? Chances are if you are a millennial you wouldn’t, as you’re probably not wearing one and you might not even own one. You’re more likely to check via some piece of versatile technology, which might be a smart phone, smart watch, tablet, fitness tracker or other multipurpose device. It’s amazing to think the effect technology has had on something as simple as telling the time, so how have advances in technology changed learning experiences and styles?

Young millennials using smart devices to check information

From push to pull

Technology has changed our lives and continues to do so, both at home and at work, in a rapidly evolving digital world. As a result of this, employees now have different expectations and preferences, learning styles have changed from a tradition push model to a more modern pull model. So what is push and pull and what’s the difference between them?

Historically employees would be invited to formal training, typically in a classroom, which would be at a time suitable for the trainer or training team. The employee would sit and listen whilst the trainer would go through a presentation, with the delegate taking reels of notes. The employee might be required to take a formal test (no talking or conferring please), and the success of the training and the employee would be based on the pass or failure of that test. The employee would be sent back to the workplace and often not given an opportunity to put into practice what they had learnt.

The Ebbinghaus forgetting curve, shows 50% of classroom training is forgotten in an hour if theory isn’t put into practice. So how effective could this method of training actually be? And at what cost to the organisation?

Millennials pulling away from the push model

Today’s employees, specifically millennials – who according to PwC will make up 50% of the global workforce by 2020 – expect a different kind of learning experience. The pull model, whereby employees are able to access material whenever (work, home or on the go), however (desktop PCs, laptops, mobiles, tablets and face to face) and through whatever source (search, eLearning, assessment, video share, blogs, forums, knowledge share, mentors, communities and networks) is what these employees expect, desire and need.

Young businesswoman contemplating learning at her desk with a range of technology and devices around her

The 70.20.10 approach

The 70.20.10 framework, which has been gaining momentum in recent years, takes on a different approach to learning, moving away from a formal classroom environment which provides little to no practice in the workplace after a training course is complete. The principle of this learning framework is 70% experience and practice, 20% conversations with people and networks and 10% formal learning. The approach moves away from formal structured learning techniques, where it’s thought to be more costly, inefficient and does not provide flexibility for the employee or employer.  The 70.20.10 approach goes hand in hand with millennial expectations and is complemented in our digital era where information, networks and communities are more easily accessible.

What can employers do?

By creating a culture where employees willingly share skills and knowledge is critical for success within an organisation. A study by BlessingWhite found employee development is one of the biggest drivers of retention and engagement, and aside from just retaining staff, employees are more capable and motivated in the workplace and within their role.

If employees are given access to the right tools and knowledge, they will drive their own development and will seek information themselves. Technology can help organisations to provide collaborative learning environments for their employees and help to create a one stop shop for employee learning, development and training resources, allowing employees to gain access to this information when they need to.

This collaborative learning space can be provided through a virtual hub, whereby learning, development and training tools and resources are all found in one place. This space allows for a continuous learning environment, whereby employees can pull on any information and resources they require at that time, in a format which is conducive to their learning style and from wherever they are. Digital eLearning modules provide interactive learning quickly and effectively to delegates, saving time and resources compared to traditional methods. Other forms of technology can also be utilised such as apps and games, through multiple channels including mobile, harnessing a 70.20.10 learning environment.

Collaboration between two colleagues at a desk using mobile, a laptop and a tablet device to show blended learning

The final word on the evolving learning experience

Technology is rapidly changing the world around us, both at home and at work. With millennials soon becoming the majority of employees in the workplace, it is critical to ensure their learning and development needs are met. Moving away from a traditional push model to a pull model, whereby employees are responsible for their own development and are able to seek the information they require when, where and how they need to, will lead to more capable and motivated employees and ensure organisations are retaining talent. Time to autonomy is quicker, employees are competent and confident in their roles and organisations save on costs of traditional formal training and move to digitalised solutions, which can provide a one stop shop for employees.

If you would like to understand how Unicorn Training can help with meeting your learning and development needs, get in touch! Call us on 0800 055 6586, drop us an email, or why not tweet us?

The Learning Ecosphere Explained

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few weeks, it’s likely that you’ll have come across the ‘Learning Ecosphere’ in some capacity. Launched at last month’s Learning Technologies show, this brand new concept seeks to reimagine the relationship between traditional and new learning methods – and offers businesses the chance to better understand how they can embrace both in order to strengthen their overall learning strategies.

Here, Mark Jones – Commercial Director of Unicorn – gives a brief overview of the Learning Ecosphere concept:

Don’t forget, you can still get your free copy of the Learning Ecosphere Whitepaper here.

Trends from LT17 – Part 2

We pick up with part two of our blog looking back at the overarching trends and themes from last week’s Learning Technologies show… 

The changing role of L&D

Dr Tobias Kiefer, Global Learning Leader Advisory at Ernst & Young Munich, described the role of L&D departments as becoming ‘conductors of the orchestra’.

No longer will L&D teams set the whole training agenda, rather the concept of OYOL (Own Your Own Learning) will grow, with learners becoming consumers who create their own curriculum to reach the level they want in the areas they choose.

Picture of a speaker on stage at the Learning Technologies conference

This idea that employees choose from a menu of learning relevant to them was also advocated by Rachel Kay, Managing Director, Thales Learning and Development.

She identified two types of learners – those who are hungry and self-motivated and those comfortable with the ‘feed me’ culture, who like taking part in scheduled events and training. The aim is to create environments where ‘feed mes’ become ‘hungrys’ with Amazon-style learning menus reflecting the key skills and behaviours the business wants an employee to have. ‘Feed me’ words such as training, trainers and courses have been replaced by talent, performance and coaches to help this.

Both speakers reinforced the point that social learning is everything, and how solutions are generated by talking. This mindset is akin to making the tearoom globally available to let conversations happen organically and for ideas to ‘marinate’.

L&D diagram on a screen at the LT conference

Dr Kiefer believes a target of 70% OYOL is achievable, even in regulated businesses, with L&D providing professional development guidance and acting as curators, challengers, storytellers, economists and data analysts. The role of L&D becomes about moderating, engaging, helping and stimulating new thinking until the critical point where an individual finds the ‘hunger’ and takes ownership of it themselves.

Where does technology fit in?

In the most basic form technology is the great enabler to all this.

What was really interesting was that all the most popular themes of personalisation, social, informal, self-directed learning, collaboration etc, which prevailed at Learning Technologies feature in the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere, launched at the event (you can download the whitepaper here.)

The Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

The Learning Ecosphere looks how the learner-focused world holds great potential to augment and enhance the personal learning experience, but balanced with the fundamental underlying need for an enterprise to define, manage and report on the inevitable core competencies that remain in every business.

Mobile, just-in-time microlearning, mobile delivery, Bring Your Own Device, gamified learning and social media all present a wealth of opportunities through which to really nurture the ‘hunger’ for OYOL in staff, but in complementing, not replacing, the enterprise-focused concerns of governance, risk and compliance, secure platforms, tracking and reporting and mandatory formal assessed learning.

Although the idea of giving staff the choice to do learning where and when they want is high on the list of demands to suppliers now, Rachel Kay raised an interesting point on the moral position of asking employees to engage in learning outside of office hours. She concluded that in reality no one can be forced to work outside their contracted hours, all you can do is provide such diverse, appetizing learning menu to try to create the hunger in people to start picking at it themselves.

When it comes to fostering social learning she also identified the power of WhatsApp in creating informal discussion groups where some of the best learning and knowledge sharing takes place.

Last year games were the Learning Technologies hot topic. This year it felt like people had moved from not quite being sure where games could fit into a learning programme but being mildly intrigued, to now seeing their value and looking at whether actually introducing elements of gamified learning might be right for them.

Could the same level of recognition towards personalisation and learner-led learning be evident by Learning Technologies 2018? Time will tell…

Visiting Learning Technologies? Here’s what you can expect from Unicorn this week…

If you’re remotely connected to L&D, this is shaping up to be a pretty big week! Learning Technologies returns to Kensington Olympia across Wednesday 1st and Thursday 2nd February – bringing together over 7000 visitors all keen to get their hands on the latest in education tech. From tomorrow, we’ll be joining over 200 of our contemporaries from across the learning industry as we exhibit at this year’s show. If you’re swinging by, here are the top 5 things you can look forward to:

  1. Get your hands on the free ‘Learning Ecosphere’ whitepaper.

Discover the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

Discover how learning technologies can smooth the dichotomy between traditional and modern learning with the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere – the subject of our whitepaper launching at the show.

The underlying need for an enterprise to define, manage and report on the competence of its staff has not changed. Environmental, safety and other regulatory demands on organisations are here to stay, while data security requirements are greater than ever.

But how does this fit with such concepts as social learning, collaboration and BYOD? How do we dip our toes into this fast flowing stream of opportunity in a way that is effective, relevant and affordable, and consistent with the practical day to day demands on our time, budgets and resources? What tools should we be using? What are the implications for e-learning design?

Pick up your free copy at stand P14.

The Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

  1. If you need a little persuasion, go and see our very own Mark Jones giving you an overview at one of his two free seminars

12:30-13:00 on both Wednesday and Thursday, Theatre 8. Where are you in the Learning Ecosphere?

Mark will seek to explore some of the issues facing businesses wishing to explore new learning methods. We’ve all heard the buzzwords and seen a flurry of new micro learning and learning Apps, but how do we really go about introducing effective ‘learning reinforcement’ – and where do we start? In a world where learning is changing, and we’re increasingly urged to explore new training formats, how do we ensure that we’re doing is going to work?

Join Mark to find out more, as well as discover our brand new mobile reinforcement app, Minds-i.

Mark Jones picture

  1. Come and have a go at QuizCom and you could win a Unicorn!

Yep, you read that right – come and try your hand at our giant swipe game and you could be the proud owner of your very own Unicorn. Our enthusiastic quiz hosts will be tough not to spot, as they’ll be sporting bright orange blazers and encouraging you to try your luck with our latest game. Loaded with questions covering everything from learning trends to star wars trivia, this is the perfect way to trial a brand new product from Unicorn aimed at getting your staff engaged whilst challenging them to prove their knowledge in a topic of your choice.

Win a Unicorn by playing QuizCom

Winners announced at 4pm each day, plus bonus prizes for two players picked at random!

  1. Check out Mike Hawkyard giving you a little insight into learning games and apps in corporate learning.

15:30-16:00 on Thursday, Theatre 8: Learning games and engagement.

We’ve all heard 101 talks lately about ‘gamification’, but this isn’t one of those talks. Mike is the Managing Director of an award winning games studio who have produced apps played more than two billion times in the last three years.

In recent months, Amuzo have been training people how to fly Star Wars™ Drones and encouraging children to build LEGO® models to rescue LEGO® Mini Figures trapped on erupting volcanoes. Join Mike for a session that will look at:

  • How the technology and best practice used in these exciting projects is identical to that being used in work for companies like KPMG and the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII)
  • How to explore the possibilities of learning games for your business
  • Experiencing Amuzo’s latest product to engage staff with corporate communications; QuizCom
  • …And you might even win a prize or two!

Mike Hawkyard picture

  1. Finally, if you’re at the conference, go and see Richard Owen from the CII talk about their learning journey.

15:30-16:40 on Thursday, Conference Theatre T5S6: Organisational learning – Creating better learning outcomes for the learner and the business.

Richard Owen – Product Manager at the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) lifts the lid on how the CII have approached their corporate learning. He looks at the value of online learning for the learner and the business alike, and shares experiences of the challenges that the CII has faced in creating better user experience despite a highly regulated, compliance driven context. From topic-specific pathways, powerful diagnostic tools and a more intuitive interface, discover how the CII has trebled its uptake of its content within just 12 months with a little help from us!

We’ll be live blogging from LT, as well as tweeting from @unicorntraining. Don’t forget to stop by and see us at stand P14 across the event, as well as take some time to relax in the Unicorn café!

Join us at stand P14

A little reflection ahead of Craig Weiss’ annual LMS report

We’re just a few days away from eLearning guru, Craig Weiss, revealing his much-anticipated Top 50 LMS Report for 2017, and yep, there are a few nerves kicking in.

In 2016 our LMS topped Craig’s rankings for the world’s top system for the financial sector for the second year running and was fourth overall across all sectors, so we’re super excited to find out if our hard work over the past 12 months can make it an FS table topping hat-trick and see our LMS move up in the overall rankings again.

With this on our minds, it made us ponder just how eventful 2016 had been for Unicorn, and what standards we set ourselves to live up to this year. Not only were we so happy about Craig’s ranking but there were plenty of awards to celebrate too.

Unicorn at the Learning Technologies Awards Dinner

Our games arm Amuzo had their industry-leading genius recognised with gold in the Creative Digital Impact category at the Dorset Business Awards while their Playmobil Police Chase game won the 2016 TOMMI Award for Best Kids’ App!

The TOMMI is the children’s software award of Germany. Every year since 2002 the TOMMI Prize has been awarded at the Frankfurt Book Fair to the most innovative and outstanding software title developed specifically for children, showing Amuzo are appreciated far beyond these shores too. Pretty cool huh?

Amuzo win a the Dorset Business Awards

Then there was the awesome success of our partners, FSTP, who were named winners of the Most Effective Training Firm at the Compliance Register Awards.

FSTP scoop an award

FSTP work closely with us on developing all of our Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) content, and their knowledge and experience proved invaluable in the build up and throughout 2016 as many of our clients grappled with the new Senior Managers’ Regime and Certification amongst other complex mandatory topics.

We were also delighted to scoop a bronze at the eLearning Awards with Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank for the platform implementation that has introduced MyLearning, and changed the way the whole organisation approaches L&D.

Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank take a Bronze at the Learning Technologies Awards

With our partners at Credit Suisse, who joined us for the evening, also taking home a silver in the Learning Technologies Team of the Year category it topped a pretty successful 2016 for us Unicorns.

The bar has been set pretty high for 2017 now, but hopefully Craig’s report will help us kick off the year as we mean to go on. Get crossing everything!

Beating the Forgetting Curve: The Psychology of Apps in Learning

Here at Unicorn HQ we have a favourite quote: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” Originally attributed to Benjamin Franklin, it’s not just a tag line, it’s become something of a mantra to live by…

Benjamin Franklin quote on blue background

In the rapidly changing world of digital technology, we’ve got smart-device overload. Nowadays, the possibilities for deploying learning are just about endless, as people’s unrestricted access to the latest tech means almost complete ubiquity of smart phones, tablets and portable computers. Whilst this fact presents new and exciting possibilities for changing the ways we deliver and consume learning, the basic principles that underpin the learning experience remain for the most part unchanged. What Mr Franklin aptly hit upon in his quote of which we are so fond is the idea that in order to catalyse real behavioural (or ‘real life’) change, the learning experience must be both memorable and immersive.

Enhancing knowledge retention and designing learning interventions that reinforce and give practical context goes beyond simply making courses compatible with the latest operating systems, devices and browsers. Instead, we need to go deeper into the psychological process that underpins learning and shift our understanding of the learning problem from a simple question of delivery to something more fundamental.

Image of the brain with labels representing different elements of memory

The Psychology Bit

Taking into account the brain’s capacity to absorb, retain and actively recall information, the challenge we consistently face is to find ways to deliver learning that percolates beyond the superficial layers of a person’s memory and taps into the longer term psyche. We know with the move away from traditional, PC-based linear training towards something more dynamic, that learning requirements are changing. Rather than ‘box-ticking’, organisations increasingly recognise the need to deliver learning that goes deeper to yield real behavioural change.

In order to achieve this, learning solutions must tailor educational experiences to navigate the potential pitfalls of the learning process without causing cognitive overload, or allowing learners to simply forget what they have been taught. In order to achieve this, it’s important to deliver learning experiences in digestible chunks, with follow-up and reinforcement that means learners are then encouraged to use and consolidate the learning soon after the original intervention. In the context of compliance training, this approach begins to reposition learning not simply as an annual necessity, but rather as something embedded in the regular activities of learners.

Ebbinghaus' forgetting curve graph

Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve: the longer we wait to apply newly acquired knowledge to real-life situations, the more likely we are to forget it – with the act of recall becoming more difficult the further in to the past the learning took place. learners often forget an average of 90% percent of what they have learned within the first month!

Getting Ahead of the Curve

Here at Unicorn, we believe that one such way to deliver learning that sticks is through the use of mobile Apps.

The average iPhone user unlocks their phone an average of 80 times per day. -Business Insider

Portable technology is increasingly synonymous with modern life – presenting a unique opportunity to deploy learning content straight to a user’s pocket wherever they may be. By understanding these ‘mobile moments’, we have the opportunity to form the framework for including mobile applications into wider learning strategy. Rather than looking to deploy full learning content to mobile, a more effective proposition is to focus Apps on learning reinforcement using microbites of engaging content – short videos, polls, quizzes, check-lists – with simple gamification elements, nudges and prompts to encourage regular revisits.

Apps then become a key element in a blended solution. Whilst a person might still be expected to complete a mandatory 30-minute course on a particular subject, the added functionality of an App means that we’re now able to add in extra layers to the learning experience.

My Learning Lounge App from Unicorn

When we start to reimagine learning as non-linear, we open up opportunities to draw in other psychological principles: whether the challenge and reward balance; social collaboration and knowledge sharing, or ‘just in time’ content that gives users the ability to reference bitesized supplementary learning content for reference in everyday situations. As products of modern society, we are already part-programmed to rely on Apps and other forms of mobile interactions in our day-to-day lives –social networking, news, or even the simple use of a fitness or alarm App. If learning and development professionals can leverage mobile technology as a powerful additional channel through which to deliver timely, relevant learning content, then we are already going some way towards combatting the forgetting curve and making sure that learning sticks.

Our partnership with world class games studio, Amuzo, means that we are already seeing the benefits of extrapolating the ‘sticky’ elements of game and app design into wider learning programmes. Once the underpinning psychological principles involved in gaming are understood, the potential for the scope and context of their application is limitless. Read more about apps in learning here.

Why Serious Games? 6 Key Benefits

We’ve heard A LOT about game-based learning lately. Here we bring you an extract from our recent whitepaper, including a run-down of 6 benefits of games in learning, and some clarification around the difference between ‘games’, ‘serious games’ and ‘gamification’.

Benefit 1: Engagement

Image showing a flow diagram to illustrate the benefits of games for learning
With active engagement, serious games lead to discovery, observation, trial and error and problem solving, important aspects of learning (Dickey, 2005).

Benefit 2: Flow
Video games promote ‘flow’, when there is a perceived balance between the challenge and skills required – the player knows what to do (has goals) and how successful they are via immediate feedback (Csikszentmihalyi, 1991).

Difference between different gaming termsBenefit 3: Sharing
Games typically allow users to share their score with others and see it displayed on leaderboards, making it competitive, which is a natural driver of human behaviour (Squire and Jenkins, (2003). This can support groups of learners, even when geographically distributed, and develop team-based skills, leadership, coordination and communications skills (de Freitas, 2006).

Benefit 4: Learning by doing
Games provide a learning environment where players discover new rules by interacting and exploring the game, rather than memorising them, leading to knowledge acquisition (Squire, 2011), and self-motivation, thus becoming more active in their own learning (Michael and Chen, 2006).

Benefit 5: Monitoring progress
The effects of corporate training applications must be measurable; the distinction must be made between ‘performance’ and ‘learning outcomes’. Game play often focuses on performance, measuring skills that have already been mastered while discouraging trial and error, but may not measure depth of knowledge gained. Assessment can be quantitative and qualitative and should allow learners to get feedback on the consequences of their actions.

Benefit 6: Risk free
Simulation allows learners to experience something too costly, risky, or ethically unacceptable in real-life (Corti, 2006). But this approach assumes players can see the similarities/context and may need support transferring the knowledge (Crookall, 2010). Many papers have emphasised how games should be used to enhance training, not replace it (Science Daily, 2010).

Another diagram showing how effective game based learning is

Want the full low-down on serious games? Check out our whitepaper here.

VIDEO BLOG: Donald Taylor Asks “Who’s In Control of Learning?”

You might have seen us wandering around Learning Technologies armed with a large video camera and a smile? Well here are the tantalising fruits of all that labour… 

In the first in our series of video blogs from Learning Technologies, conference Chair, Donald H. Taylor reveals that, for him, ‘Who’s in control of learning?’ was the key theme and question that came out of this year’s event.

He adds: “We’ve had people asking more pertinent, probing questions, and I think we’re getting to the stage now where we’re questioning much more about what we’re doing in this space and are prepared to be a little bit assertive about how to change things.”

Want more? You don’t have to wait with further interviews from Learning Technologies at our Unicorn Training TV YouTube channel (click below).

UTTV_feb16_med

BLOG: Designing A Learning Game – Where Do You Start??

We all learn from games, even when we don’t realise it. Who discovered London through Monopoly, has picked up random general knowledge facts from Trivial Pursuit or has a better grasp of geography from Risk? Computer and online games are no different, but how do you make sure you get the learning you want from a game? 

Designer%20Dan

Amuzo Games’ Dan Mascall

As he continues working on Unicorn’s Project #P2L – otherwise known as the Abbreviation Game – Amuzo Games‘ Lead Designer, Dan Mascall, reveals all.

1) When you sit down to design a game, where do you start?

The key questions we ask from the start are:

  • Who do you want to tell?
  • How do you want to tell them?
  • What do you want them to do?

The initial brief will typically answer these questions, indicating the target audience, the message to deliver and key performance indicators (KPIs) e.g. how many players the game should attract in its first year.

Unicorn

Dan goes through the Abbreviation Game brief and talks multi-platform at Unicorn

From there we research the information and take reference from similar games and gameplay mechanics that would complement the goals. The majority of projects will take on new trends and ideas to add flavour or simplify the approach.

We will also often suggest alternative directions if we feel confident that a different solution would be better suited to deliver results.

2. What was in the forefront of your mind when it came to the initial design of the Abbreviation Game?

“Which games have I played before where I learnt abbreviations and why was I motivated to learn them?”

And yes, I have played an abbreviation game before! Check out the classic Fighting Fantasy adventure books ‘Sorcery’ series.

3. The Abbreviation Game is designed to teach, so how did you decide on what method would work best to make the game most effective?

We’re working with closely with our partners Unicorn Training on the project, combining our team’s extensive knowledge of game development and their expertise in digital learning.

Games offer the chance to learn new skills in a fun and engaging environment. Through the process of repetition and the natural desire to progress, players learn and experiment with new information to overcome increasing difficulties.

Practice-2

Screenshot from Amuzo’s RNLI ‘Lifeguards’ game

In the past Amuzo has developed an educational game for the RNLI to teach players the values and skills required to be a lifeguard, which received over 600,000 game plays, as well as a brain training suite of games for Learning and Teaching Scotland’s student intranet and an internal training game to teach staff at Aviva the benefits of their pension scheme.

Social mechanics and achievement milestones are implemented to drive players to learn more, get ahead and complete goals.

In the Abbreviation Game a quiz-based challenge is included at the end of each session to assist in bridging the gap between the abbreviation and its meaning.

It’s always important for any game that the player has fun first before we ask them to think a little deeper or follow a call to action. I’m definitely an advocate out to prove that games can teach.

shogun_total_war_warlords_edition_hir0510_04

Shogun – Total War

I have a fairly comprehensive knowledge of weapons from World War Two thanks to Call of Duty, an enthusiasm for the subject of warfare during the Sengouku period of Japanese history because of Shogun: Total War and a real world applicable trading skill known as ‘market making’ from Eve Online!

4) How long does the game design process take approximately, from initial idea to finished design?

It varies depending on the size of the project. A significant factor that influences timescales is how many people are involved with signing off designs. New IP takes significantly more time to lock down character designs, style guides and story content whereas with established brands we can hit the ground running.

Abbreviations Game in progress

Abbreviations Game in progress

Using the Abbreviation Game as an example, from presenting the concept internally to sharing and signing off with the client took roughly two months.

The design part represented about two weeks of this process, producing and updating the first round of documentation. The design documentation doesn’t necessarily reach ‘finished’ state as features are iterated, adapted and improved during the process.

The Game Design Document (GDD) is consistently referred to and updated throughout a project as a ‘live’ document.

5. You are the main designer of the game but how many other people input into it?

The philosophy of idea generation is that we all have great ideas and everyone can contribute. Our documentation system is open to the wider team to view and comment on during the process.

After the initial concept phase, the ideas are discussed and developed within the design team, presented to the lead artists and coders and then written up as a first draft. The game takes shape as the GDD is produced, often introducing new ideas as we progress.

Dan introduces the Abbreviation Game

Dan introduces the Abbreviation Game

To facilitate these ideas we have two options that can be entered into our project management system: ‘Improvements’ and ‘New Features’. These are reviewed each week as we plan the next weeks work. Some make it in and some drop in priority. The decisions generally relate to what we consider the Minimum Viable Product (MVP). This ensures we complete the project on time and within budget.

All ideas that didn’t make it in the first time are stored within a ‘Backlog’ list, so should the project come together ahead of time, receive extra budget or have scope for future updates we can make further enhancements.

6. Who gets the final say on the outcome of the design of the game?

The game design is ultimately signed off by the client. Generally the team at Amuzo often come to the same conclusions as we all play games, keep up with the latest trends and instinctively know what works best.

Dragon%20Boat

Amuzo go Dragon Boat racing!

It also helps having a great team of people that all get on, both during and after work time. Watch out for our next beach BBQ, Dragon Boat Race or Kahuna burger challenge, everyone is welcome!

7. Is there anything else we should know?

At the time of writing, a colleague has just approached me to brag about their unbeatable high score in the Abbreviation Game. Bring it on!

And don’t forget . . . ASBMAETP, acronyms should be memorable and easy to pronounce. BFN (bye for now!).

4 Hot Topics at Learning Technologies 2015

Unicorn Training was back with a bang at Learning Technologies this year.

A

Over the course of two days an estimated 7,000 visitors popped into Olympia to feast their eyes on the 150 free L&D seminars and 250 exhibitors. Upstairs at the conference, the likes of Professor Sugata Mitra and Professor Robert Winston had audiences in the palm of their hands as they discussed independent and group learning and the changing nature of the human brain.

But downstairs there was a real buzz at the expo as L&D delegates from across the globe descended to discover what’s new in the world of workplace learning. The exhibition always offers a great opportunity to exchange thoughts and experiences of the eLearning world, and this year was no exception including some rather innovative knowledge sharing ideas on the café walls.

B

Our team of Unicorns was on hand throughout to answer questions, give demos and have a good old natter about anything learning related.  

C

Over the course of an action packed two days, here are the four key buzzwords you’d have overheard as you walked by the Unicorn stand:

Gamification

D

Unicorn recently proved we’re serious about serious games by joining forces with chart-topping game studio Amuzo and there was standing room only at Amuzo MD Mike Hawkyard’s seminar ‘Learning Games – You Cannot Be Serious!’ Mike revealed how businesses are unlocking game qualities such as problem solving, in-play feedback, rewards, leaderboards and, of course, fun, to bring about effective learning and changes in behaviours and culture.

Delegates were keen to hear how our partnership with Amuzo will enable us to inject game principles into even such unpromising areas as mandatory compliance training, while also taking our sector leading face-to-face business simulations online, making them more readily available in the workplace or on the move.

eCreator

E

LT visitors were treated to the official launch of our new eCreator authoring tool. The team were on hand to give demos on how to make simple, effective and great quality learning in less time than your lunch! The eCreator is a graphically rich, user-friendly, flexible tool for the fast, simple creation, delivery and editing of learning content at the desktop and on mobile. Find out more.

Compliance

There’s no denying that compliance is at the core of corporate learning. That’s why LT visitors were keen to find out more about our solution, ComplianceServe.

F

Throughout both days on the Unicorn stand, the team wowed delegates with first hand demos of how ComplianceServe helps ensure regulatory and compliance content is up-to-date and relevant, management information for clients is robust and easy to access and learners’ training is completed, tracked and reported. It’s no wonder ComplianceServe is the preferred choice for compliance.

Global Top 5 LMS

Just days before Learning Technologies, we were enormously proud to learn that our learning and performance platform, SkillsServe, was ranked in the World’s top five LMSs and the number one for financial services in a new report from leading global eLearning analyst and consultant Craig Weiss.

G

The 2015 Top 50 Global LMSs Report offers a review of 645 systems and ranks the top 50 based on various factors and analysis including on features, design, vertical reach, support/service, future thinking approach and processes.

Unicorn Training has been creating learning and development and compliance solutions for over 25 years. Unicorn’s experience, industry expertise and award-winning creativity have helped the company grow to be a market leader. In 2013 Unicorn was named ‘Outstanding Learning Organisation’ at the eLearning Awards in our 25th anniversary year while Unicorn’s Samantha Yates was the 2014 eLearning Designer of the Year.

H

Award-winning, BAFTA nominated Amuzo specialise in the creation of online and mobile games for some of the most exciting global brands. Amuzo games have been played well over half a billion times in the last two years alone and have reached No.1 on the App Store in 147 countries.

Be sure to visit our stand at Learning Technologies 2016 to play some of the exciting serious games we’re currently creating.

For more information about anything we’ve discussed above – and much more – drop us a line today on 0845 130 5138 or email enquiries@unicorntraining.com

And if you fancy becoming a Unicorn we’re recruiting so check out our current vacancies. Apply today and, who knows, you could be on our stand at Learning Technologies 2016!