Tag Archive | serious games

What is gamification and when is it appropriate?

In this new blog series, we will be examining the use of gamification for eLearning.  Gamification it is rapidly becoming commonplace due to our advancing IT infrastructure, the effectiveness of game design, and shifting cultural perceptions as games become mainstream.

Indeed, many large companies such as Cisco, Samsung, Deloitte, Google, Domino’s and Microsoft are already using gamification for training or business needs:

Gamification - why is it appropriate? Graph with blue and orange bars

 

What is gamification?

Gamification refers to the application of elements and techniques found in entertainment games to enhance a non-game’s content or delivery thereof. It doesn’t mean you are making a game – simply that you are borrowing underlying mechanics or psychology from game design.

A simple example of gamification would be the incorporation of a progress bar into a questionnaire or eLearning course. Since they give immediate and visual feedback, they can be used to encourage completion by leveraging positive reinforcement, and our learned drive to see things in a 100% state.

Top view of smiling woman completing gamified online learning on her laptop

Finding the right tool for the job

Gamification is all about taking and using the best tools that games have at their disposal – but individual tools have a specific purpose and function, they are not to be used universally as a panacea.

This means you won’t always use everything in your gamification toolkit. There will be instances where a leaderboard (social interaction and competitive drive) is not the correct approach, but points-levelling (positive reinforcement) and daily challenges (short-term retention) might be, because they give different benefits that address different problems.

Adding gamification to a solution may be detrimental if it’s not fulfilling a specific purpose, as you will be incurring additional development costs and distracting from the content rather than enhancing it.

Image showing a businessman using a mobile device for gamified learning

What are the benefits?

The most observable benefits of gamification can be considered:

  • Clarity – games frequently employ modern user interface design, which presents information in a digestible format that is intuitively accessible. Many games will present their tutorials in textless images for example.
  • Engagement – games can immerse and seize attention, enticing participation. Through the same means they can evoke compulsion for increased reuse or retention, often using advancement or progression systems that positively reinforce the user.
  • Enjoyment – games are all about fun, but not all their fun derives from play. The design and feel of many supporting systems or the levity of an experience provide a fun factor. Simple examples would entail the use of colour, sound and interactive interface elements.
  • Influence – games can have a powerful social element. A number of experiences leverage this reach to impact wider networks or reinforce a target community’s uptake. Popular ‘self-help’ sites encourage users to provide answers to one another and to award a virtual currency to helpful users. Although the currency is worthless, it acts as a powerful status symbol, encouraging interaction within the community and users to help one another.

You should carefully consider whether the solution really needs gamification, or in what form. It might be that a Serious Game or Simulation might be preferable if you require a more thoroughly compelling or experiential answer.

Gamification – the application of game elements. For example, progress bar, badges, competition.

Serious Games – game for training, education or awareness. For example, The Oregon Trail, America’s Army.

Simulation – true to life reproduction for experiential training. For example, flight and medical simulators

As an eLearning example, mandatory training does not need to compel learners to participate or reach out to their colleagues – they already have to complete it – but perhaps making dry content more enjoyable or improving the clarity of dense information would lend to a better learning experience.

Team collaborating on their learning and using technology

Game over

The most important thing to remember is that gamification is a toolkit for addressing specific solution needs as listed previously, distinct as an approach from Serious Games and Simulations.

Following this brief introduction to the subject, future entries will explore specific examples of applying gamification to a solution, discuss the merits of gamifying learning in greater depth and give you some top tips when designing with gamification in mind. We may also see similar introductions to Serious Games and Simulations as their own topic.

Why Serious Games? 6 Key Benefits

We’ve heard A LOT about game-based learning lately. Here we bring you an extract from our recent whitepaper, including a run-down of 6 benefits of games in learning, and some clarification around the difference between ‘games’, ‘serious games’ and ‘gamification’.

Benefit 1: Engagement

Image showing a flow diagram to illustrate the benefits of games for learning
With active engagement, serious games lead to discovery, observation, trial and error and problem solving, important aspects of learning (Dickey, 2005).

Benefit 2: Flow
Video games promote ‘flow’, when there is a perceived balance between the challenge and skills required – the player knows what to do (has goals) and how successful they are via immediate feedback (Csikszentmihalyi, 1991).

Difference between different gaming termsBenefit 3: Sharing
Games typically allow users to share their score with others and see it displayed on leaderboards, making it competitive, which is a natural driver of human behaviour (Squire and Jenkins, (2003). This can support groups of learners, even when geographically distributed, and develop team-based skills, leadership, coordination and communications skills (de Freitas, 2006).

Benefit 4: Learning by doing
Games provide a learning environment where players discover new rules by interacting and exploring the game, rather than memorising them, leading to knowledge acquisition (Squire, 2011), and self-motivation, thus becoming more active in their own learning (Michael and Chen, 2006).

Benefit 5: Monitoring progress
The effects of corporate training applications must be measurable; the distinction must be made between ‘performance’ and ‘learning outcomes’. Game play often focuses on performance, measuring skills that have already been mastered while discouraging trial and error, but may not measure depth of knowledge gained. Assessment can be quantitative and qualitative and should allow learners to get feedback on the consequences of their actions.

Benefit 6: Risk free
Simulation allows learners to experience something too costly, risky, or ethically unacceptable in real-life (Corti, 2006). But this approach assumes players can see the similarities/context and may need support transferring the knowledge (Crookall, 2010). Many papers have emphasised how games should be used to enhance training, not replace it (Science Daily, 2010).

Another diagram showing how effective game based learning is

Want the full low-down on serious games? Check out our whitepaper here.

ATD 2016 Day 2

Day 2 started with the key note address by Simon Simek. As you can see it was popular. Simon is a brilliant speaker.

Image of a conference hall taken from in the audienceYou can check him out on Ted Talk and I recommend you do. Here are just a few jottings from his talk today: Leadership should be based on trust. If you trust your people (and they trust you), you can create an environment of co-operation and mutual support and the rest will follow. If you create a culture of distrust, then don’t be surprised if employee behaviour degrades to cynicism, self-interest and paranoia. He used the behaviour of the investment banks leading up to the banking crash (and since) to illustrate the poison in a culture based on an addiction to short term money driven goals.

It is not enough to have a vision just to be the best or the biggest –  the Vision must be visible (think Martin Luther King or JFK). A crystal clear sense of what the future looks like that your people can believe in will provide a sense of common purpose.

That clear vision makes it possible to measure progress along the way and incentivise it, give people a sense of achievement. But financial incentives don’t create loyalty (see investment banks again). Recognition; feeling valued; a sense of pride all release serotonin and are much more likely to make your people want to come to work, do a great job, and help their colleagues and stay loyal.

In a similar vein, companies that are driven by notions of maximising shareholder returns with for example a policy of layoffs if short term (and often arbitrary) targets are at risk, is destructive of long term value. I wish this were always true, but I fear the ability of shareholders to cash in quickly means that that long term failure is often not at their expense or that of the overpaid, bonus-led senior executives.

Simon’s final point was about the importance of unselfish behaviour and generosity to colleagues. Leadership is not about being in charge; it’s about taking care of the people in your charge.

Suitably inspired, we headed off to the Expo. Like everything else here it was impressively large. You can’t possibly visit it all, so we focused on mobile learning Apps and games. That narrowed it down very quickly. There are not yet many great products or applications in this space – but we did find a few. Mindmarker’s mobile reinforcement App was a particular stand out, as was UMU, and we’ll be following those up when we get back to the UK. SwissVBS (see yesterday’s blog) and GameLearn also have some innovative products that merit a closer look.

My next conference session was the renowned Michael Allen of Allen Interactions. Michael has been in e-learning as long as I have, and since long before it was called ‘e-learning’ so he has a long term perspective and is always worth listening to. His book, Guide to E-Learning is a classic of the ID world.

Michael began by asking, “has ID kept up with learning technology?” (answer No (!)), but did not expand on that thought and moved on to focus on the hot topic du jour – serious learning games. He summed up the tension between learning design and games design brilliantly in the remark that, “there isn’t a game that ID can’t suck all the fun out of”.

Some good common sense followed in Michael’s 7 Simple Success Factors, and here they are:

Screen showing a drop down of key points with a highlighted title

The importance, and the difficulty, in adding game features that enhance but do not distract from the learning is one of the great challenges for the learning professional as we struggle to bring together two very different cultures – maximise fun vs. maximise learning. These are pioneering days.

It was fitting then to move next to the session on “Playing Games to Learn” with Sharon Boller. This was a highlight session. Sharon succeeded brilliantly in demonstrating the essence of a good game whilst teaching us all at the same time, almost without us realising it.

She achieved this by getting us to play games and then drawing out the key elements in each case and applying them to a learning context. For example, our table of 10 played a game called Timeline, which is in essence a simple alignment game – put cards in the right date order. Sounds pretty mundane but as a game it was great fun. We then evaluated it along the lines below:

Closeup of screen showing bullet points and a small image at the bottom

You could apply this game based approach in any e-learning that involves processes or work flows.

I recommend you try Password Blaster (it’s available from the App store) –  a delightful little example of an effective learning game, especially if you remember the Atari 2600 or Space Invaders.

One final takeaway: points, badges and leaderboards are ok, but they are the least effective game design elements in the longer term.

The day ended with a visit to the Wynkoop Brewing Company for a craft beer party, an essential networking event as I’m sure you’ll agree!

NEWS: Unicorn and Amuzo Launch ‘The Future of Game-based Learning’ White Paper

Is interest in games and gamification just another fashionable hot topic for the learning Twitterati? Or is there a real trend that is going to significantly impact on the industry? This is just one issue scrutinzed in a new joint Unicorn Training and Amuzo White Paper analyzing ‘The Future of Game-based Learning’ launched today (Tuesday 19 January 2016).

The_Future_of_Game_based_learning-_front cover_med

The White Paper examines such questions as, if demand for games-based learning is there, what are the implications for suppliers? Also in the future could the LMS migrate on to your Xbox or PS4, or is the concept of educational games consoles beginning to happen already?

Produced by award-winning eLearning solutions providers, Unicorn, with games partner Amuzo, ‘The Future of Game-based Learning’ looks at the drivers and benefits behind the demand for game-based learning and sets these against the findings of academic research and literature.

By 2018 over half the UK’s working population is set to be part of ‘Generation Y’- born between 1980 and the early ‘90s. The White Paper assesses how and why games could revolutionize workplace learning for ‘Gen Y’, before concluding with how the eLearning industry can capitalize on the opportunities game-based learning presents, without massive budgets.

Games_can_make_learning_fun_inforgraphic_p6-1024x768Peter Phillips, Unicorn CEO, explains: “Last year Unicorn with Amuzo commissioned Bournemouth University to conduct a ‘Serious Games Market Assessment’. But, outside of its initial objectives, this report also delivered an insight into the real-life, on-the-ground challenges and opportunities the eLearning industry faces in combining fun with learning substance, which planted the seeds for this White Paper.

“Games and gamification have been the hottest topics in the industry for the past couple of years, but we wanted to better understand if this was likely to be a fad, soon to go the way of ‘The LMS is dead’ or Google Glass, or if there was something real and commercially viable behind this trend, that is going to make this one stick.”

Delivered in conjunction with eLearning Age and Bournemouth University Faculty of Media and Communication, ‘The Future of Game-based Learning’ gets its official launch at Learning Technologies 2016 conference and exhibition, where Unicorn will be on Stand P14 at Olympia on Wednesday 3 and Thursday 4 February.

Game_image_p10-1024x683

Mike Hawkyard, Amuzo MD, will also be providing his award-winning insight into building games for learning in two free talks at 12.30pm on both days as part of the exhibition’s extensive seminar programme.

Mike added: “There is an evident element of ‘fear of the unknown’ surrounding the subject of learning through games and gamification. However, there are over 12 million reasons why mobile learning games are the solution to building upon and enhancing the effectiveness, productivity and confidence of your workforce. Those 12m reasons are ‘Gen Y’.”

Download your copy of ‘The Future of Game-based Learning’ here!

For more information about Unicorn Training visit www.unicorntraining.com and to come and see us at Learning Technologies 2016 – register for free entry to the Learning Technologies and Learning and Skills 2016 exhibitions and seminars at www.learningtechnologies.co.uk

BLOG: Designing A Learning Game – Where Do You Start??

We all learn from games, even when we don’t realise it. Who discovered London through Monopoly, has picked up random general knowledge facts from Trivial Pursuit or has a better grasp of geography from Risk? Computer and online games are no different, but how do you make sure you get the learning you want from a game? 

Designer%20Dan

Amuzo Games’ Dan Mascall

As he continues working on Unicorn’s Project #P2L – otherwise known as the Abbreviation Game – Amuzo Games‘ Lead Designer, Dan Mascall, reveals all.

1) When you sit down to design a game, where do you start?

The key questions we ask from the start are:

  • Who do you want to tell?
  • How do you want to tell them?
  • What do you want them to do?

The initial brief will typically answer these questions, indicating the target audience, the message to deliver and key performance indicators (KPIs) e.g. how many players the game should attract in its first year.

Unicorn

Dan goes through the Abbreviation Game brief and talks multi-platform at Unicorn

From there we research the information and take reference from similar games and gameplay mechanics that would complement the goals. The majority of projects will take on new trends and ideas to add flavour or simplify the approach.

We will also often suggest alternative directions if we feel confident that a different solution would be better suited to deliver results.

2. What was in the forefront of your mind when it came to the initial design of the Abbreviation Game?

“Which games have I played before where I learnt abbreviations and why was I motivated to learn them?”

And yes, I have played an abbreviation game before! Check out the classic Fighting Fantasy adventure books ‘Sorcery’ series.

3. The Abbreviation Game is designed to teach, so how did you decide on what method would work best to make the game most effective?

We’re working with closely with our partners Unicorn Training on the project, combining our team’s extensive knowledge of game development and their expertise in digital learning.

Games offer the chance to learn new skills in a fun and engaging environment. Through the process of repetition and the natural desire to progress, players learn and experiment with new information to overcome increasing difficulties.

Practice-2

Screenshot from Amuzo’s RNLI ‘Lifeguards’ game

In the past Amuzo has developed an educational game for the RNLI to teach players the values and skills required to be a lifeguard, which received over 600,000 game plays, as well as a brain training suite of games for Learning and Teaching Scotland’s student intranet and an internal training game to teach staff at Aviva the benefits of their pension scheme.

Social mechanics and achievement milestones are implemented to drive players to learn more, get ahead and complete goals.

In the Abbreviation Game a quiz-based challenge is included at the end of each session to assist in bridging the gap between the abbreviation and its meaning.

It’s always important for any game that the player has fun first before we ask them to think a little deeper or follow a call to action. I’m definitely an advocate out to prove that games can teach.

shogun_total_war_warlords_edition_hir0510_04

Shogun – Total War

I have a fairly comprehensive knowledge of weapons from World War Two thanks to Call of Duty, an enthusiasm for the subject of warfare during the Sengouku period of Japanese history because of Shogun: Total War and a real world applicable trading skill known as ‘market making’ from Eve Online!

4) How long does the game design process take approximately, from initial idea to finished design?

It varies depending on the size of the project. A significant factor that influences timescales is how many people are involved with signing off designs. New IP takes significantly more time to lock down character designs, style guides and story content whereas with established brands we can hit the ground running.

Abbreviations Game in progress

Abbreviations Game in progress

Using the Abbreviation Game as an example, from presenting the concept internally to sharing and signing off with the client took roughly two months.

The design part represented about two weeks of this process, producing and updating the first round of documentation. The design documentation doesn’t necessarily reach ‘finished’ state as features are iterated, adapted and improved during the process.

The Game Design Document (GDD) is consistently referred to and updated throughout a project as a ‘live’ document.

5. You are the main designer of the game but how many other people input into it?

The philosophy of idea generation is that we all have great ideas and everyone can contribute. Our documentation system is open to the wider team to view and comment on during the process.

After the initial concept phase, the ideas are discussed and developed within the design team, presented to the lead artists and coders and then written up as a first draft. The game takes shape as the GDD is produced, often introducing new ideas as we progress.

Dan introduces the Abbreviation Game

Dan introduces the Abbreviation Game

To facilitate these ideas we have two options that can be entered into our project management system: ‘Improvements’ and ‘New Features’. These are reviewed each week as we plan the next weeks work. Some make it in and some drop in priority. The decisions generally relate to what we consider the Minimum Viable Product (MVP). This ensures we complete the project on time and within budget.

All ideas that didn’t make it in the first time are stored within a ‘Backlog’ list, so should the project come together ahead of time, receive extra budget or have scope for future updates we can make further enhancements.

6. Who gets the final say on the outcome of the design of the game?

The game design is ultimately signed off by the client. Generally the team at Amuzo often come to the same conclusions as we all play games, keep up with the latest trends and instinctively know what works best.

Dragon%20Boat

Amuzo go Dragon Boat racing!

It also helps having a great team of people that all get on, both during and after work time. Watch out for our next beach BBQ, Dragon Boat Race or Kahuna burger challenge, everyone is welcome!

7. Is there anything else we should know?

At the time of writing, a colleague has just approached me to brag about their unbeatable high score in the Abbreviation Game. Bring it on!

And don’t forget . . . ASBMAETP, acronyms should be memorable and easy to pronounce. BFN (bye for now!).

BLOG: How do you build a serious game? Like this!

AbbGame_MockupScreen_MilkFloatHow do you create a serious game? Codename ‘Project #P2L’, with Amuzo Games we’re developing a game to show you just how easy it is to produce powerful interactive learning games that can greatly benefit the approach your company takes to L&D. Amuzo’s Hannah explains all…..press ‘Play’ to start.

Rewind

‘Project #P2L’ = a game designed to teach and help people memorise sets of abbreviations. The game will be interchangeable to fit any theme to suit the specific needs of the consumer. This could be anything from marketing acronyms to insurance industry abbreviations and anywhere in between.

You can read more about this in an earlier blog ‘Play to learn: the impact of serious games’.

Game time

keep-calm-because-yolo-24Staying true to our own motto of ‘fun first’, I’ll explain the concept using a not-so-serious serious game example.

Let’s paint a theoretical picture: You’re a parent. You’re totally out of touch with the youth of today. You have a teenager. When they text you they seem to be speaking code. You’ve told them they can’t go out tonight because it’s a weekday, the reply: “OMG you’re so weird LOL. I’m going anyway YOLO!”

You have absolutely no idea what the abbreviations mean but you need to find out. Now here’s how Project #P2L can help you out without you seeming totally uncool and unknowledgable . . .

How it works

Project #P2L is a fast-paced racing game designed for mobile and tablets.

Your vehicle will drive itself forward but it’s your job to instruct it when to change lanes.

AbbGame_MockupScreen_MilkFloat_scoreBefore the vehicle sets off, and again at various points throughout the game, you will be shown phrases that can be abbreviated to an acronym, for example ‘Laugh Out Loud’. The aim of the game is to collect the letters that form the abbreviations shown.

Every few metres you will encounter a row of letters blocking your path, one letter in the row will always be correct and your goal is to collect them in the right order. To get the highest score you must travel as far as you can before time runs out. Abbreviations collected in the correct order will gain you extra time, however you will be penalised for wrong abbreviations. Collecting the wrong letters will restart the abbreviation.

This game idea has been designed primarily as a learning aid to enhance and improve the training of staff in the corporate sector.

Pause

In Part 3 of the Project #P2L blog series we will delve deeper into the design process – from the logistics of how it will work to the overall look of the game.

4 Hot Topics at Learning Technologies 2015

Unicorn Training was back with a bang at Learning Technologies this year.

A

Over the course of two days an estimated 7,000 visitors popped into Olympia to feast their eyes on the 150 free L&D seminars and 250 exhibitors. Upstairs at the conference, the likes of Professor Sugata Mitra and Professor Robert Winston had audiences in the palm of their hands as they discussed independent and group learning and the changing nature of the human brain.

But downstairs there was a real buzz at the expo as L&D delegates from across the globe descended to discover what’s new in the world of workplace learning. The exhibition always offers a great opportunity to exchange thoughts and experiences of the eLearning world, and this year was no exception including some rather innovative knowledge sharing ideas on the café walls.

B

Our team of Unicorns was on hand throughout to answer questions, give demos and have a good old natter about anything learning related.  

C

Over the course of an action packed two days, here are the four key buzzwords you’d have overheard as you walked by the Unicorn stand:

Gamification

D

Unicorn recently proved we’re serious about serious games by joining forces with chart-topping game studio Amuzo and there was standing room only at Amuzo MD Mike Hawkyard’s seminar ‘Learning Games – You Cannot Be Serious!’ Mike revealed how businesses are unlocking game qualities such as problem solving, in-play feedback, rewards, leaderboards and, of course, fun, to bring about effective learning and changes in behaviours and culture.

Delegates were keen to hear how our partnership with Amuzo will enable us to inject game principles into even such unpromising areas as mandatory compliance training, while also taking our sector leading face-to-face business simulations online, making them more readily available in the workplace or on the move.

eCreator

E

LT visitors were treated to the official launch of our new eCreator authoring tool. The team were on hand to give demos on how to make simple, effective and great quality learning in less time than your lunch! The eCreator is a graphically rich, user-friendly, flexible tool for the fast, simple creation, delivery and editing of learning content at the desktop and on mobile. Find out more.

Compliance

There’s no denying that compliance is at the core of corporate learning. That’s why LT visitors were keen to find out more about our solution, ComplianceServe.

F

Throughout both days on the Unicorn stand, the team wowed delegates with first hand demos of how ComplianceServe helps ensure regulatory and compliance content is up-to-date and relevant, management information for clients is robust and easy to access and learners’ training is completed, tracked and reported. It’s no wonder ComplianceServe is the preferred choice for compliance.

Global Top 5 LMS

Just days before Learning Technologies, we were enormously proud to learn that our learning and performance platform, SkillsServe, was ranked in the World’s top five LMSs and the number one for financial services in a new report from leading global eLearning analyst and consultant Craig Weiss.

G

The 2015 Top 50 Global LMSs Report offers a review of 645 systems and ranks the top 50 based on various factors and analysis including on features, design, vertical reach, support/service, future thinking approach and processes.

Unicorn Training has been creating learning and development and compliance solutions for over 25 years. Unicorn’s experience, industry expertise and award-winning creativity have helped the company grow to be a market leader. In 2013 Unicorn was named ‘Outstanding Learning Organisation’ at the eLearning Awards in our 25th anniversary year while Unicorn’s Samantha Yates was the 2014 eLearning Designer of the Year.

H

Award-winning, BAFTA nominated Amuzo specialise in the creation of online and mobile games for some of the most exciting global brands. Amuzo games have been played well over half a billion times in the last two years alone and have reached No.1 on the App Store in 147 countries.

Be sure to visit our stand at Learning Technologies 2016 to play some of the exciting serious games we’re currently creating.

For more information about anything we’ve discussed above – and much more – drop us a line today on 0845 130 5138 or email enquiries@unicorntraining.com

And if you fancy becoming a Unicorn we’re recruiting so check out our current vacancies. Apply today and, who knows, you could be on our stand at Learning Technologies 2016!

Unicorn and Amuzo Ask ‘Learning Games – You Cannot Be Serious!’ at LT15

Gather%20MushroomsEver wondered how games could fit into your learning strategy?

Unicorn Training are delighted to announce that Mike Hawkyard, MD of Unicorn’s educational games partners, Amuzo, will deliver a seminar on ‘Learning Games – You Cannot Be Serious!’ at Learning Technologies on Wednesday 28 January.

Games and gamification are the fastest growth areas in learning and development and Mike will be looking at how businesses are unlocking game qualities such as problem solving, in-play feedback, rewards, leaderboards and, of course, fun, to bring about effective learning and changes in behaviours and culture.

The seminar will take place in Theatre 5 from 10:15 to 10:45 including audience Q&A.

Award-winning eLearning specialists Unicorn and chart-topping game studio Amuzo have joined forces to bring World Class mobile and cross-platform game experience to educational games for the corporate sector.

3e2f276Mike said: “Amuzo has a proven track record in producing amazing games across many platforms. We focus on engagement, retention and most importantly, fun.

“Games present players a clear set of goals and a ruleset that must be followed in order to achieve them. They offer instructions, rewards, challenges and upgrades to keep users motivated in their quest. When people fail, they don’t think twice about pressing ‘replay’ to improve performance and try again.”

Peter Phillips, Unicorn Training CEO, added: “We have always been committed to action learning. By investing in a leading games company we are demonstrating that we are serious about serious games.

“Amuzo are World Class game developers and publishers with priceless experience of creating and developing some of the most iconic games of the last 15 years within their team. Their creativity, skills and knowledge complement our own proven record in creating learning that gets results.”

SaveTheDate_Email-page-001Come and see Unicorn on stand 95, marked with pink balloons, at Learning Technologies 2015 on 28-29 January. Anyone visiting the stand over the two days has the chance to win a champagne balloon ride!

Unicorn Training has been creating learning and development and compliance solutions for over 25 years.

Unicorn’s experience, industry expertise and award-winning creativity have helped the company grow to be a market leader. In 2013 Unicorn was named ‘Outstanding Learning Organisation’ at the eLearning Awards in its 25th anniversary year.

Award-winning, BAFTA nominated Amuzo specialise in the creation of online and mobile games for some of the most exciting global brands. Amuzo games have been played well over half a billion times in the last two years alone and have reached No.1 on the App Store in 147 countries.

For more information about Unicorn Training visit www.unicorntraining.com and to discover the world of Amuzo Games visit www.amuzo.com

News: Game On As Unicorn And Amuzo Partner To Take Learning To Next Level

Cows%20vs%20Sheep%20goalsUnicorn Training and chart topping game studio Amuzo have entered multiplayer mode to unlock the next level in serious games and learning.

Unicorn has invested significantly in Amuzo, with the two award-winning Bournemouth companies combining to bring World Class mobile and cross-platform game experience to educational games for the corporate sector.

Games and gamification are the fastest growth areas in learning and development as firms unlock how game qualities such as problem solving, in-play feedback, rewards, leaderboards and, of course, fun, can bring about effective learning and changes in behaviours and culture.

Gather%20MushroomsThe partnership will enable Unicorn to greater inject game principles into even such unpromising areas as mandatory compliance training, while also taking online its sector leading face-to-face business simulations, making these more readily available in the workplace or on the move.

Peter Phillips, Unicorn Training CEO, said: “We have always been committed to action learning. By investing in a leading games company we are demonstrating that we are serious about serious games.

“Amuzo are World Class game developers and publishers with priceless experience of creating and developing some of the most iconic games of the last 15 years within their team.

“Their creativity, skills and knowledge complement our own proven track record in creating learning that gets results. Together we can make learning fun and more effective at the same time.”

LEGO%20Hero%20Factory%20Invasion%20From%20BelowMike Hawkyard, Amuzo MD, added: Amuzo has a proven track record in producing amazing games across many platforms. We focus on engagement, retention and most importantly, fun.

“Games present players a clear set of goals and a ruleset that must be followed in order to achieve them. They offer instructions, rewards, challenges and upgrades to keep the user motivated on their quest. When people fail, they don’t think twice about pressing the replay button to improve their performance and try again.

“This partnership is a tremendous opportunity to combine both companies’ core skills to enhance the learning experience.”

Unicorn Training has been creating learning and development and compliance solutions for the UK’s ever-changing financial services for over 25 years. Unicorn’s experience, industry expertise and award-winning creativity have helped the company grow to be a market leader.

Cows%20vs%20SheepIn 2013 Unicorn was named ‘Outstanding Learning Organisation’ at the eLearning Awards in its 25th anniversary year.

Award-winning, BAFTA nominated Amuzo specialise in the creation of online and mobile games for some of the most exciting global brands. Amuzo games have been played well over half a billion times in the last two years alone and have reached No.1 on the App Store in 147 countries.

For more information about Unicorn Training visit www.unicorntraining.com and to discover the world of Amuzo Games visit www.amuzo.com