Tag Archive | technology

Old trainer, new tricks – 7 steps to make the transition from facilitator to eLearning designer

Unicorn Training Speech Bubble

Continuing the theme of learning nuggets from our award-winning content team, Emma Parnell shares some insight about transitioning from being a classroom based trainer to an eLearning designer.

Having been a trainer for the best part of 20 years, a lot has changed in terms of how training can be delivered to the learner. Moreover the demand for instant, at your fingertips learning has grown beyond all expectation and I wanted to be part of the new way of doing things. So how did someone like me, an ageing facilitator with a phobia of technology, make the transition to eLearning designer?

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks and maybe sometimes that’s true. Let’s turn this on its head a bit by thinking about what you know and what you do well but just do it differently. I did this and I have identified 7 steps that show how you can transfer your existing skills to eLearning.

Here are my 7 steps to becoming a successful eLearning designer:

Gamification In Business Concept Illustration

Step 1:
Imagine a computer is a classroom – eLearning design software is evolving rapidly and is becoming more interactive and responsive than ever. It’s now possible to create eLearning that interacts with the learner perhaps in a similar way to how you do as a facilitator. For example, you can ask the learner questions and they can respond by selecting answers or typing in a reply and this can link to feedback that can tell the learner how well they did.

Step 2:
Think like a learner – When deciding on what should be in a piece of eLearning, consider the sort of questions the learner might have. Even though you are not with them in a classroom you can incorporate potential questions into engaging training such as a case study or a scenario.

Step 3:
Less is more – You wouldn’t talk constantly for 2 or 3 hours in face-to-face training, so don’t make eLearning just one long piece of text. If the content makes for a long course, consider breaking it down into bite-size chunks of learning that makes it easier to digest and doesn’t require too long attention span.

Workplace with person working on laptop watching video player, concept of webinar, business online training, education on computer, e-learning concept, video tutorial vector illustration

Step 4:
Use your imagination – what kind of learning engages you and keeps your attention? The chances are that your learners will be just like you in that way, so think of creative ways to present your content.

Step 5:
Are words always necessary – Don’t be tempted to add lots of text to set a scene or describe a situation in place of the words you would use as a facilitator. Instead use animation and illustrations more. Too much text on a page is a turn-off for learners. They say a picture paints a thousand words and in eLearning this is good to remember.

Step 6:
Talking to the learner – I was concerned that I couldn’t communicate with a learner in eLearning. Actually you can still talk to the learner in an eLearning environment by adding audio to the course. If you combine audio with graphics/video then it becomes more show and tell, just like you would in a classroom environment. Audio and graphics together are as good a combination as fish and chips.

Step 7:
Finally, don’t be afraid to try things out – Many authoring products offer free trial periods and great instruction for use, so give something a go. I reckon you will be a better eLearning designer than you might think. Above all, have fun with it.

I took the leap and it works so please, give it a go, you never know where it will lead.

^Concept of distance learning and education. Online tutorial and video course, research and graduation, science and webinar, digital elearning, test and literature. Set of thin, lines flat icons

Highlights: The Open University’s Trends in Learning 2017 from the CIPD Learning & Development Show

Earlier this week we visited the CIPD Learning & Development Show in London, one of our favourite sessions was from The Open University’s Simon Tindall, Head of New Business Worldwide.

Simon’s session gave insight from The Open University’s Institute of Educational Technology (IET) research, where they identified 6 key trends in learning for 2017:

  1. Learning for the future
  2. Learning through social media
  3. Productive Failure
  4. Formative Analytics
  5. Learning from the crowd
  6. Design thinking

We’ll explore each trend in a little more detail below:

OU CIPD

Learning for the future

Learners will need to be agile, curious and adaptive in the workplace. With rapid developments in technology, employees will need to move to a continual learning process in order to keep up to date and ready for future trends. There will also be a shift away from the more formal ‘one big event’ type of training, to informal, bite size training delivered through multimedia. Science has taught us our brains prefer and are more receptive to multi media stimulation and therefore this learning style preference will go hand in hand with delivery through collaborative training environments.

Employees will need to learn a variety of skills with a focus on soft skills such as building resilience, being ready and receptive to change and having an understanding about global networking, as well learning traditional hard skills. Learning will need to incorporate informal styles, where employees are able to collaborate in a positive, stress free environment – think nurture and reward.

Learning through social media

Social media is undeniably a big part of modern social life and it can, and is being used to bring learning to life. Social media is incredibly accessible, easy to use and can be accessed on the go. This style of training delivery can provide pockets of information and just in time learning, harnessing on a creative and collaborative environment where learners enjoy learning.

Employees should also be able to communicate and gain/provide support peer-to-peer both locally and globally. Although there are many benefits to learning through social media, organisations still have some way to go in accepting the ‘social’ aspect of using this type of learning in a work environment. It is therefore likely most organisations will need a cultural shift in expectations before social media learning at work becomes the norm.

Productive Failure

Deep learning and focus often comes from learners making mistakes and problem solving through situations. This approach to learning means employees are learning through failure and tackling these sometimes very complex problems themselves, through exploration and a need to have a more thorough understanding of the topic. The question organisations will need to ask themselves – is your organisational learning culture set up to allow learners to fail? Employees will need to feel they are able to fail (and learn from it) without being blamed for their mistakes. It’s likely most organisations will need to go through a cultural change in order to adopt this type of learning environment where it’s ok to fail and managers understand employees are likely to have a more deepened knowledge of the subject through this type of approach.

Formative Analytics 

The measurement for learning, which provides information on a personal and individual basis and enables organisations to interpret employees reactions and experiences toward training content. The benefit of this type of analytics is it provides organisations with in-depth information allowing for training to be tailored to the learner. The act of matching preferences to future experience is something which happens a lot in the retail world, for example if you purchase a coffee machine from an online retailer they will capture this information and interpret your preferences, in this instance coffee. The next time you visit their online store you will be shown product links for related items such as coffee beans or coffee mugs, tailoring the shopping experience to you.

Learning can be seen in the same way, if we collect and understand data about learning preferences and experiences we are able to provide learning pathways based on this, so if a learner has shown a preference towards video based learning, we can then tailor this for future learning.

Learning from the crowd

Peer-to-peer learning both internally within the organisation and externally either locally or globally. This trend is closely linked to the learning through social media trend we outlined above and also focuses on collaborative learning principles. Information typically is high value, learners are self motivated and their needs can be fostered through a learning community where employees can be innovative, creative, collaborative and share/learn with peers. This type of learning experience can be harnessed through the use of technology, providing digital spaces within the organisation for employees to share ideas, technical knowledge or experiences and provide a culture where employees are encouraged to interact, be curious, share information and problem solve situations together.

Design thinking

This is a similar approach to how design teams work, whereby they work with prototypes, process mapping and a continuous loop of reviewing and improving. This approach can help organisations to develop ideas quickly, whilst reviewing them and refining them over time. Training has always typically followed a top down approach, whereby managers decide how, when and where employees will learn, design thinking puts the learners at the heart of the learning and tries to understand problems they are trying to solve. This agile and flexible approach is outcome focused and will need organisations to create time for space and creativity and encourage employees to work collaboratively with other areas of the business to understand different possibilities.

Has your organisation already starting implementing any of the trends predicted by The Open University for this year? Let us know below.

 

Unicorn Summer Client Forum Announced

Although it still feels like 2017 has only just arrived, we’re very nearly into May, which means it’s time for our next Client Forum!

Thanks to a brand new structure (and a little help from a beautiful City venue) our Autumn Forum in October last year was by far our best to date, and we can’t wait to share what we’ve been up to since then.

Image showing visitors at the Autumn Unicorn Client Forum at 40 Bank Street Canary Wharf

As part of our commitment to great customer support, we believe it’s important to keep running these forums in order to give you the chance to hear about new products and services, industry trends and future developments first hand. With this in mind, the next Unicorn Client Forum will be held on Thursday 8th June, at the O2 Intercontinental Hotel, 1 Waterview Drive, London.

London the O2 showing the dome, thames, city and intercontinental hotel which is where we will hold the next client forum

The Summer Forum will offer a range of sessions from our Senior Relationship Management Team, Product Managers, Executive Team, Clients and Special Guests (keynote). Following the launch of our Learning Ecosphere whitepaper at Learning Technologies back in February, we will continue to address themes of new technology, engagement and changing behaviours in corporate learning.

Unicorn Marketing Manager Abi introduces guests to the day's itinerary at the Autumn Client Forum

Throughout the day we will also be offering sessions on Cyber Awareness, GRC (including T&C, GDPR and MiFID II) and showcasing our brand new reinforcement app, Minds-i, following its official launch at ATD in Atlanta.

A full session breakdown and registration portal will be available this week and can be found by contacting your Unicorn Relationship Manager, or the Marketing Team.

Unicorn Summer Forum June 2017 at the O2 Intercontinental Hotel
**Please note that we will be starting this event late morning to allow you time to vote in the UK General Election. We will have a live feed throughout the day, and anyone concerned about timings can still register for a postal vote by following this link.**

Technology in the workplace: How learning experiences are changing

If I asked you for the time, would you check on your analog wristwatch? Chances are if you are a millennial you wouldn’t, as you’re probably not wearing one and you might not even own one. You’re more likely to check via some piece of versatile technology, which might be a smart phone, smart watch, tablet, fitness tracker or other multipurpose device. It’s amazing to think the effect technology has had on something as simple as telling the time, so how have advances in technology changed learning experiences and styles?

Young millennials using smart devices to check information

From push to pull

Technology has changed our lives and continues to do so, both at home and at work, in a rapidly evolving digital world. As a result of this, employees now have different expectations and preferences, learning styles have changed from a tradition push model to a more modern pull model. So what is push and pull and what’s the difference between them?

Historically employees would be invited to formal training, typically in a classroom, which would be at a time suitable for the trainer or training team. The employee would sit and listen whilst the trainer would go through a presentation, with the delegate taking reels of notes. The employee might be required to take a formal test (no talking or conferring please), and the success of the training and the employee would be based on the pass or failure of that test. The employee would be sent back to the workplace and often not given an opportunity to put into practice what they had learnt.

The Ebbinghaus forgetting curve, shows 50% of classroom training is forgotten in an hour if theory isn’t put into practice. So how effective could this method of training actually be? And at what cost to the organisation?

Millennials pulling away from the push model

Today’s employees, specifically millennials – who according to PwC will make up 50% of the global workforce by 2020 – expect a different kind of learning experience. The pull model, whereby employees are able to access material whenever (work, home or on the go), however (desktop PCs, laptops, mobiles, tablets and face to face) and through whatever source (search, eLearning, assessment, video share, blogs, forums, knowledge share, mentors, communities and networks) is what these employees expect, desire and need.

Young businesswoman contemplating learning at her desk with a range of technology and devices around her

The 70.20.10 approach

The 70.20.10 framework, which has been gaining momentum in recent years, takes on a different approach to learning, moving away from a formal classroom environment which provides little to no practice in the workplace after a training course is complete. The principle of this learning framework is 70% experience and practice, 20% conversations with people and networks and 10% formal learning. The approach moves away from formal structured learning techniques, where it’s thought to be more costly, inefficient and does not provide flexibility for the employee or employer.  The 70.20.10 approach goes hand in hand with millennial expectations and is complemented in our digital era where information, networks and communities are more easily accessible.

What can employers do?

By creating a culture where employees willingly share skills and knowledge is critical for success within an organisation. A study by BlessingWhite found employee development is one of the biggest drivers of retention and engagement, and aside from just retaining staff, employees are more capable and motivated in the workplace and within their role.

If employees are given access to the right tools and knowledge, they will drive their own development and will seek information themselves. Technology can help organisations to provide collaborative learning environments for their employees and help to create a one stop shop for employee learning, development and training resources, allowing employees to gain access to this information when they need to.

This collaborative learning space can be provided through a virtual hub, whereby learning, development and training tools and resources are all found in one place. This space allows for a continuous learning environment, whereby employees can pull on any information and resources they require at that time, in a format which is conducive to their learning style and from wherever they are. Digital eLearning modules provide interactive learning quickly and effectively to delegates, saving time and resources compared to traditional methods. Other forms of technology can also be utilised such as apps and games, through multiple channels including mobile, harnessing a 70.20.10 learning environment.

Collaboration between two colleagues at a desk using mobile, a laptop and a tablet device to show blended learning

The final word on the evolving learning experience

Technology is rapidly changing the world around us, both at home and at work. With millennials soon becoming the majority of employees in the workplace, it is critical to ensure their learning and development needs are met. Moving away from a traditional push model to a pull model, whereby employees are responsible for their own development and are able to seek the information they require when, where and how they need to, will lead to more capable and motivated employees and ensure organisations are retaining talent. Time to autonomy is quicker, employees are competent and confident in their roles and organisations save on costs of traditional formal training and move to digitalised solutions, which can provide a one stop shop for employees.

If you would like to understand how Unicorn Training can help with meeting your learning and development needs, get in touch! Call us on 0800 055 6586, drop us an email, or why not tweet us?

Visiting Learning Technologies? Here’s what you can expect from Unicorn this week…

If you’re remotely connected to L&D, this is shaping up to be a pretty big week! Learning Technologies returns to Kensington Olympia across Wednesday 1st and Thursday 2nd February – bringing together over 7000 visitors all keen to get their hands on the latest in education tech. From tomorrow, we’ll be joining over 200 of our contemporaries from across the learning industry as we exhibit at this year’s show. If you’re swinging by, here are the top 5 things you can look forward to:

  1. Get your hands on the free ‘Learning Ecosphere’ whitepaper.

Discover the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

Discover how learning technologies can smooth the dichotomy between traditional and modern learning with the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere – the subject of our whitepaper launching at the show.

The underlying need for an enterprise to define, manage and report on the competence of its staff has not changed. Environmental, safety and other regulatory demands on organisations are here to stay, while data security requirements are greater than ever.

But how does this fit with such concepts as social learning, collaboration and BYOD? How do we dip our toes into this fast flowing stream of opportunity in a way that is effective, relevant and affordable, and consistent with the practical day to day demands on our time, budgets and resources? What tools should we be using? What are the implications for e-learning design?

Pick up your free copy at stand P14.

The Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

  1. If you need a little persuasion, go and see our very own Mark Jones giving you an overview at one of his two free seminars

12:30-13:00 on both Wednesday and Thursday, Theatre 8. Where are you in the Learning Ecosphere?

Mark will seek to explore some of the issues facing businesses wishing to explore new learning methods. We’ve all heard the buzzwords and seen a flurry of new micro learning and learning Apps, but how do we really go about introducing effective ‘learning reinforcement’ – and where do we start? In a world where learning is changing, and we’re increasingly urged to explore new training formats, how do we ensure that we’re doing is going to work?

Join Mark to find out more, as well as discover our brand new mobile reinforcement app, Minds-i.

Mark Jones picture

  1. Come and have a go at QuizCom and you could win a Unicorn!

Yep, you read that right – come and try your hand at our giant swipe game and you could be the proud owner of your very own Unicorn. Our enthusiastic quiz hosts will be tough not to spot, as they’ll be sporting bright orange blazers and encouraging you to try your luck with our latest game. Loaded with questions covering everything from learning trends to star wars trivia, this is the perfect way to trial a brand new product from Unicorn aimed at getting your staff engaged whilst challenging them to prove their knowledge in a topic of your choice.

Win a Unicorn by playing QuizCom

Winners announced at 4pm each day, plus bonus prizes for two players picked at random!

  1. Check out Mike Hawkyard giving you a little insight into learning games and apps in corporate learning.

15:30-16:00 on Thursday, Theatre 8: Learning games and engagement.

We’ve all heard 101 talks lately about ‘gamification’, but this isn’t one of those talks. Mike is the Managing Director of an award winning games studio who have produced apps played more than two billion times in the last three years.

In recent months, Amuzo have been training people how to fly Star Wars™ Drones and encouraging children to build LEGO® models to rescue LEGO® Mini Figures trapped on erupting volcanoes. Join Mike for a session that will look at:

  • How the technology and best practice used in these exciting projects is identical to that being used in work for companies like KPMG and the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII)
  • How to explore the possibilities of learning games for your business
  • Experiencing Amuzo’s latest product to engage staff with corporate communications; QuizCom
  • …And you might even win a prize or two!

Mike Hawkyard picture

  1. Finally, if you’re at the conference, go and see Richard Owen from the CII talk about their learning journey.

15:30-16:40 on Thursday, Conference Theatre T5S6: Organisational learning – Creating better learning outcomes for the learner and the business.

Richard Owen – Product Manager at the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) lifts the lid on how the CII have approached their corporate learning. He looks at the value of online learning for the learner and the business alike, and shares experiences of the challenges that the CII has faced in creating better user experience despite a highly regulated, compliance driven context. From topic-specific pathways, powerful diagnostic tools and a more intuitive interface, discover how the CII has trebled its uptake of its content within just 12 months with a little help from us!

We’ll be live blogging from LT, as well as tweeting from @unicorntraining. Don’t forget to stop by and see us at stand P14 across the event, as well as take some time to relax in the Unicorn café!

Join us at stand P14

Tips to Overcome the Top 6 eLearning Barriers Preventing Learners’ Engagement

Rolling out eLearning within your organisation can bring about many challenges. Listed below are the top 6 obstacles you could face and our quick tips as to what you can do to overcome them.

#1 Limited Tech Experience:

For non-tech savvy individuals, there is sometimes a fear that comes with having to complete online learning. This is often rooted in the preconception that in order to complete digital tasks, a certain level of technical knowledge is required.

What you can do: create online demos and webinars that offer help and guidance when it comes to accessing and utilising the Learning Management System in question.

Young woman trying to use a laptop computer. Representing lack of technical knowledge

#2 Past Experience:

We have all been there, dreading eLearning due to bad (or worse, boring) past experiences.

What you can do: Get your learners excited about your eLearning programme. Stress the advantages of the course in advance and explain how it will benefit them in their daily lives. Be clear about what they should expect when they undertake the course.

#3 Lack of Motivation:

Linking in with boring past experiences, a lack of motivation can be one of the biggest push backs when implementing eLearning.

What you can do: Get your learners actively involved and engaged in the learning process via gamification. At the most basic level, examples of this might be the inclusion of badges, certificates, points and leadership boards to give the learners motivation to achieve the desired outcomes.

#4 Challenging eLearning Materials:

Easy learning means learners become bored. Difficult learning means learners become frustrated and may just give up! So how do you find the balance?

What you can do: Research your audience and carry out pre-assessments (diagnostics) to find the ideal level of challenge.

Not challenging learners can lead to boredom and lack of engagement

#5 Lack of Community Involvement:

elearning can be perceived as a lonely task…sitting behind your desk clicking through the content…

What you can do: Build an online community group where learners can create forums, open up discussions on topics and share knowledge and tips.

#6 Learner Boredom:

There is no magical solution to take away the boredom factor altogether. However, you can take necessary steps to make eLearning more inspiring and engaging:

What you can do: identify the learners’ expectations, needs and goals. Include real life challenges, scenarios and problem-solving cases. Develop personal learning paths that allow online learners to choose their own learning activities (self-directed learning).

Obstacles organisations face often go beyond the 6 points listed above. As an organisation invested in the continued development of your employees – both professionally and personally – it is important to help them overcome the misconceptions and barriers of eLearning.

Beating the Forgetting Curve: The Psychology of Apps in Learning

Here at Unicorn HQ we have a favourite quote: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” Originally attributed to Benjamin Franklin, it’s not just a tag line, it’s become something of a mantra to live by…

Benjamin Franklin quote on blue background

In the rapidly changing world of digital technology, we’ve got smart-device overload. Nowadays, the possibilities for deploying learning are just about endless, as people’s unrestricted access to the latest tech means almost complete ubiquity of smart phones, tablets and portable computers. Whilst this fact presents new and exciting possibilities for changing the ways we deliver and consume learning, the basic principles that underpin the learning experience remain for the most part unchanged. What Mr Franklin aptly hit upon in his quote of which we are so fond is the idea that in order to catalyse real behavioural (or ‘real life’) change, the learning experience must be both memorable and immersive.

Enhancing knowledge retention and designing learning interventions that reinforce and give practical context goes beyond simply making courses compatible with the latest operating systems, devices and browsers. Instead, we need to go deeper into the psychological process that underpins learning and shift our understanding of the learning problem from a simple question of delivery to something more fundamental.

Image of the brain with labels representing different elements of memory

The Psychology Bit

Taking into account the brain’s capacity to absorb, retain and actively recall information, the challenge we consistently face is to find ways to deliver learning that percolates beyond the superficial layers of a person’s memory and taps into the longer term psyche. We know with the move away from traditional, PC-based linear training towards something more dynamic, that learning requirements are changing. Rather than ‘box-ticking’, organisations increasingly recognise the need to deliver learning that goes deeper to yield real behavioural change.

In order to achieve this, learning solutions must tailor educational experiences to navigate the potential pitfalls of the learning process without causing cognitive overload, or allowing learners to simply forget what they have been taught. In order to achieve this, it’s important to deliver learning experiences in digestible chunks, with follow-up and reinforcement that means learners are then encouraged to use and consolidate the learning soon after the original intervention. In the context of compliance training, this approach begins to reposition learning not simply as an annual necessity, but rather as something embedded in the regular activities of learners.

Ebbinghaus' forgetting curve graph

Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve: the longer we wait to apply newly acquired knowledge to real-life situations, the more likely we are to forget it – with the act of recall becoming more difficult the further in to the past the learning took place. learners often forget an average of 90% percent of what they have learned within the first month!

Getting Ahead of the Curve

Here at Unicorn, we believe that one such way to deliver learning that sticks is through the use of mobile Apps.

The average iPhone user unlocks their phone an average of 80 times per day. -Business Insider

Portable technology is increasingly synonymous with modern life – presenting a unique opportunity to deploy learning content straight to a user’s pocket wherever they may be. By understanding these ‘mobile moments’, we have the opportunity to form the framework for including mobile applications into wider learning strategy. Rather than looking to deploy full learning content to mobile, a more effective proposition is to focus Apps on learning reinforcement using microbites of engaging content – short videos, polls, quizzes, check-lists – with simple gamification elements, nudges and prompts to encourage regular revisits.

Apps then become a key element in a blended solution. Whilst a person might still be expected to complete a mandatory 30-minute course on a particular subject, the added functionality of an App means that we’re now able to add in extra layers to the learning experience.

My Learning Lounge App from Unicorn

When we start to reimagine learning as non-linear, we open up opportunities to draw in other psychological principles: whether the challenge and reward balance; social collaboration and knowledge sharing, or ‘just in time’ content that gives users the ability to reference bitesized supplementary learning content for reference in everyday situations. As products of modern society, we are already part-programmed to rely on Apps and other forms of mobile interactions in our day-to-day lives –social networking, news, or even the simple use of a fitness or alarm App. If learning and development professionals can leverage mobile technology as a powerful additional channel through which to deliver timely, relevant learning content, then we are already going some way towards combatting the forgetting curve and making sure that learning sticks.

Our partnership with world class games studio, Amuzo, means that we are already seeing the benefits of extrapolating the ‘sticky’ elements of game and app design into wider learning programmes. Once the underpinning psychological principles involved in gaming are understood, the potential for the scope and context of their application is limitless. Read more about apps in learning here.

ONS Reports Hike in Cyber Crime Figures

Last week the BBC reported that last year saw nearly six million instances of cyber crime in England and Wales.

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), cyber is fast-becoming the most common type of crime – with 3.8 million fraud offences and 2 million instances of computer misuse recorded between March 2015 and 2016. It also noted that the majority of these were linked to some kind of bank account fraud, meaning that as ever banks remain at the forefront of issues of cyber security.

“In today’s climate, 70% of all fraud is cyber-related”, said Arancha Sanchez (CISO, Santander) at last month’s BBA Annual Retail Banking conference, where she expressed a belief that banks have a clear duty not only to protect themselves, but also to educate and assist their customer base. “Although at present, only half of firms consider cyber security to be a priority for them.”

Online Secure Connection Concept Illustration with Padlock and Cyber Background. Online Encryption Technologies.

“The widespread use of computers, laptops and smart-phones to facilitate fraud has changed [the way we perceive crime]”, said Danny Shaw, BBC home affairs correspondent.  “[The ONS found] we are more likely to be a victim of fraud than any other type of crime, with one in 10 adults defrauded in the past 12 months.”

“Fraud and cyber offences are not a new threat and the government has been working to get ahead of the game, committing to spend £1.9bn on cybersecurity and cybercrime over the next five years.” –Policing Minister Brandon Lewis

Indeed, of the reported two million instances of computer misuse, 1.4million involved the device in question becoming infected with a malicious virus, with the remainder related to “unauthorised access to personal information” – such as hacking. As technology continues to advance, and banks seek to provide seamless, cross-platform solutions to their customer base, it is crucial that cyber awareness is given adequate attention. “Consumers need confidence in banks, and banks need confidence in customers, said Donald Toon, Director of Economic Crime Command NCA;Cyber Security is about Tech, Processes AND People.”

“Boards need to be able to heavily tasked with promoting a culture of cyber confidence. There isn’t a silver bullet when it comes to cyber security; and it’s a Chief Exec problem not just an IT one.” –Arancha Sanchez, CISO, Santander

BLOG: From Clunky to Funky – How Technology Shaped eLearning

Helen (l) gets into the spirit of The Great Duck Race at the 2012 eLearning Awards

Helen (l) gets into the spirit of The Great Duck Race at the 2012 eLearning Awards

Here is a taste of what Helen has to say – to read the full article check out the Flash-version of our 25 years digital publication. It is also available for iOS and Android apps via the eLearning Age website here.

“The first desktop computer I ever used was a first-generation Amstrad PC. It was 1989 and I was working as a Computer-Based Training (CBT) developer at the Chartered Insurance Institute in Sevenoaks.

“Although my primary role was writer, back then one person created a CBT course in its entirety. I was responsible for the instructional design, scriptwriting, programming and ‘graphics’ creation. Incredibly that PC had no hard drive; all programs and data were stored and accessed from a 5.25in floppy disk with a 360k capacity.

“Today I write this article on a laptop with a fairly modest 500GB of hard-disk space, equivalent to about 1.5m of those floppies!

“This is mirrored by an equally stunning growth in processing power. That old PC had 64K of RAM, my laptop has 4GB of RAM and a 2.5GHz processor. Apparently a singing birthday card has more processing power than that Amstrad.

“But what has been the impact for e-learning?”

Helen goes on to discuss designing early CBT courses, the arrival of Windows, the internet revolution and going mobile. There is also an awesome video from 1988 where some of Apple’s greatest minds discuss how they see technology being used in education in the future. They don’t get much wrong……!

To keep reading click on the Flash-version of our 25 years digital publication here or visit the eLearning Age website here for links to iOS and Android apps.

Once you’ve read the article why not come back and comment here or let us know what you think by tweeting us @unicorntraining